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How Long Does Bone Broth Last in The Fridge? Does it Go Bad?

Bone broth is a popular health food that is said to have a number of benefits, such as helping with arthritis, improving gut health, and boosting the immune system.

But how long does bone broth last?

Many people purchase bone broth on a regular basis and are curious about how long it lasts.

While the bones are supposed to be discarded after making bone broth, many people are preserving their broth by storing it in containers.

We will go over each type of storage container for bone broth and discuss how long they last.

This will help you determine the best plan for storing your bone broth based on your needs.

What is Bone Broth?

Bone broth is a savory liquid made by simmering bones and connective tissue in water.

It’s a staple in many cuisines, including French, Chinese, and Jewish cooking.

Bone broth is rich in minerals that support the immune system and it’s also been shown to promote gut health.

There are many different ways to make bone broth, but the basic ingredients are always the same: bones and water.

The bones can be from any animal, although chicken, beef, and fish are the most common.

The water should be filtered or distilled to remove impurities.

The key to making good bone broth is to simmer it for a long time – at least 12 hours, and up to 24 hours for beef or pork bones.

This slow cooking process allows the marrow and other nutrients to seep into the water, giving the broth its characteristic flavor and nutrition profile.

Bone broth can be enjoyed on its own as a savory drink, or used as a base for soups, stews, or other recipes.

It can also be frozen for later use.

How Long Does Bone Broth Last in The Fridge?

If you’re like me, you love bone broth. It’s delicious, nutritious, and versatile.

You can use it in soups, stews, sauces, and even as a drink on its own.

But how long does this magical elixir last?

Unfortunately, bone broth doesn’t last forever.

Even when stored properly in the fridge, it will only stay good for about 5-7 days.

After that, the quality starts to decline and it can become sour and rancid.

So if you make a big batch of bone broth, be sure to use it up within a week.

There are a few ways to extend the shelf life of your bone broth.

One is to freeze it in individual portions so that you can thaw and use only what you need.

Another is to add a bit of acidity, such as vinegar or lemon juice, which will help preserve the broth for longer.

So enjoy your bone broth while it lasts. And be sure to use it up before it goes bad.

Can You Freeze Bone Broth?

You can freeze bone broth, but it’s important to do it correctly so that the broth doesn’t become contaminated.

The best way to freeze bone broth is to use ice cube trays.

This way, you can thaw out only as much as you need at a time.

Once the broth is frozen in the ice cube trays, transfer the cubes to a freezer-safe bag or container.

Label the bag or container with the date so that you know how long it’s been in the freezer.

When you’re ready to use the frozen broth, thaw it in the refrigerator overnight.

You can then use it as you would any other type of broth.

Keep in mind that bone broth that has been frozen and thawed may not have the same flavor or texture as fresh broth.

But it will still be packed with nutrients and health benefits.

How to Store Bone Broth?

When it comes to storing bone broth, there are a few things you need to keep in mind.

First of all, it’s important to make sure that your bone broth is properly cooled before storing it.

This will help to prevent the growth of bacteria.

Once your bone broth is cooled, you can store it in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to four days.

If you want to store your bone broth for a longer period of time, you can freeze it.

Just be sure to use a freezer-safe container and label it with the date so you know when it was frozen.

Bone broth can be stored in the freezer for up to six months.

When you’re ready to use your frozen bone broth, simply thaw it overnight in the refrigerator or place the container in a bowl of warm water until it’s thawed.

Once thawed, you can reheat it on the stove over low heat until it’s warmed through.

How to Tell If Bone Broth is Bad?

When it comes to bone broth, how can you tell if it’s gone bad? The answer is, unfortunately, not as simple as we would like it to be.

There are a few key things to look out for that will help you determine whether or not your bone broth has spoiled.

The first thing you’ll want to do is take a look at the broth itself.

If it’s starting to develop a cloudy appearance or has chunks floating in it, that’s a sign that it’s beginning to spoil.

You’ll also want to give it a smell – if it smells sour or otherwise off, that’s another indication that it’s no longer safe to consume.

If you’re still not sure, the best way to tell if bone broth has gone bad is to taste it.

Take a small spoonful and see how it tastes.

If it tastes sour or otherwise off, spit it out and throw the rest of the batch away.

It’s better to be safe than sorry when it comes to food poisoning.

Conclusion

In conclusion, bone broth can last in the fridge for up to one week and in the freezer for up to six months.

However, the best way to store bone broth is to keep it in the fridge and use it within one week.

Once you have opened the bone broth, make sure to store it in an airtight container.

You can tell if bone broth is bad if it has a sour smell or if it has changed in color.

Yield: 1 Serving

How Long Does Bone Broth Last in The Fridge? Does it Go Bad?

How Long Does Bone Broth Last in The Fridge? Does it Go Bad?
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • Bone broth
  • Air-tight containers or Ziplock bags
  • Labels and markers

Instructions

  1. Store your product in an labelled container in a cool, dark place like the pantry or fridge.
  2. If your food is frozen, allow it to thaw in the fridge before cooking.
  3. Make sure to look for signs that your food has gone bad before eating it.
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